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the rise of individualism in american life, the sustainability of social welfare programs, religion and population aging and we get to all of those in the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question that every reporter is asked by his or her editor when that per approaches the idea why does this matter, why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the demographics are what my friend it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny which is the oelwein sogegian know what the profile is than you are able to today what are the confines and the reality in this country. people are choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in history that this happened voluntarily at a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: how do we know that it's falling, how is it measured and are we talking about a year or a few years, a decade and where has it happened? >> guest: they keep track of these things as you know how many people there are and how many people are born eac
in the sustainability of religion and population agents. we will get to those during the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question of every reporter has asked by his or her editor when that reporter approaches with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the fertility rates and demographics are what my friend and demographer in town here says it's like the tectonic plate shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny but it's close. once you know what the demographic profile country and society's going to be then you are able to tell what are the confines in which this reality will have to live in the country? so what we have seen now in the global phenomena is everywhere from sweden to america and canada to i ran to singapore is people choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in human history that this is happen voluntarily on a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: well how do we know that fertility is -- that is how is it measured and are we t
these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, almost -- certainly first several decades, people back in washington were saying, what have we done here? we've conquered this land but dough don't understand and it we can't good afternoon it. we should just give it back. give it back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there was so much violence. there was slavery and there was hostage taking and -- just unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. that's part two. part three is about kit carson's role in the conquest of the navajo people, and everything he did with that. monster slayer it's called, and this is from the final act of his long career, and it's probably what he is best known for, this sort of a scorched earth campaign he led into navajo country that resulted in their conquest and their removal from their beloved lands, and this great experiment that went on to try to force the navajo to become -- to settle down and become farmers and christians living in this sort of reservation on the border with texas. so it's a b
-rights laws that prohibit firing, promoting and hiring based on race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those immutable characteristics that we think are worthy of the protection of our civil rights laws. in most states there are modest exemptions to the employment at will dadoctrine, amount wrongful discharge. when an employer requires someone to break the law in order to keep their job. or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of a well-defined written public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wi de latitude, because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person that takes the risk and set up a business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their business the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. again, this is a small one. not saying that you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified for your job. in essence, what these laws do rainout are saving employers from themselves, because if they are ignoring all of the unem
idea that the first one that was abandoned. there are a lot of religions. the left turned against religion . it will pass the movement inspiration in the dr. king magnificent formula of equal votes, 1 foot in the scripture, 1 foot in the constitution. the next thing you know, returning against the spiritual base of democracy. we must remember the civil war with the century. that was grilling of manila. my textbooks of the civil war had nothing to do with slavery. to this the their textbooks in history have referred to the political movements that overthrew the lincoln government after the civil war and restored boys of permissiveness of and pair of the way for server edition. the text which refer to the move and as the redeemer. the retainers faugh terrorism as much as the terrorism the play is a world where so attuned to when it is not. grace has the power of turning your whole sense of perception of side down. the odds of internal politics of saddam. one of the chapters, but to together by 1964. yet the democratic convention and republican convention. the republicans with a part
. religion does well. this wall behind the paperback fiction combat rolls out here on a steady basis. both for locals and visitors who want something light to read. the author breakfast meats here all winter long before the metropolitan opera, which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. there is a breakfast and a lecture here. we do a lot with music and arts. the history of santa fe is vivid with two major cultures. native american, hispanic, and the anglo. now, that is actually oversimplifying things, but each one carries such a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today. we do events here. we boast the best spanish colonial art market. we sell books at the indian market, which is the largest art market in the world. for many years we have sold looks in the spanish market. again, the largest hispanic market in the world. we are falling all over each other but the sharing and the support that is universal makes it such a wonderfully exciting place to be. >> in the very early day, sa
in the battle with some religion non-profit organizations over the requirement they offer birth control coverage in their health insurance packages. while today's shift is significant, it also leaves out a big group that is also suing the government. chief washington correspondent james rosen tells us what triggered the change. >> under the new rules proposed by health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius non-profit religious employers will be able to opt out of the obamacare mandate of female contraceptive in the healthcare plan. instead insurers will be required to provide coverage, including standard birth control and items like the morning after pill. the white house says the modifications meet president obama's overarching goals. >> we had to ensure the women have access to preventative services like contraception. the policy also respects religious beliefs. >> catholic league bill donahue held the announcement as a sign of good will toward the catholic community. because the private sector firms with religious objections are not covered by the proposal and many insurance firms ar
religions, so so religion does well. this whole wall behind me is paperback fiction, and that rolls out of here on a steady basis both to locals and to visitors who want something light to read while they're traveling and nothing tooer the or my important -- too terribly important. the opera breakfast meets here all winter long before the simulcasts from the metropolitan opera which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. and there's a breakfast here and a lecture, so we do a lot with music, a lot with art and pretty much everything. the history of santa fe is rooted in three major cultures; the native american, the his hispanic and the anglo. now that's, obviously, oversimplifying things. but each one carries a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today up at the indian school. we do events for them here. we boast the best of the spanish colonial art market. we sell books up at the indian market in august which is the large native american art market in the world, and for many yea
they are discriminating against other religions. wait until you hear what the school wants to do with them. >> with super bowl sunday days away we have the school and gadgets and game that will help you score big with your next party. first on this day in history back in 1968 the king elvis became a father. elvis' wife priscilla gave birth. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! ♪ wow. [ buzz ] delicious, right? yeah. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... ♪ well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? bee happy. bee healthy. with clusters of flakes and o's. oh, ho ho... it's the honey sweetness. i...i mean, you...love. i>> good morning to you. welcome to "fox & friends first". it is friday. you have made it through the workweek. congratulations. it is time for the top 5@5:30. we begin with a fox news alert. it is a third day of the tense hostage negotiation in the state of alabama. a man holding a 5-year-old boy in an under ground bunker. cops haven't officially released the man's name yet but he is known to stay in
of resistance to federal rule in new mexico. what is going on today with the rich and diverse bodies of religion in santa fe, but we constructed that on top of this foundation of faith being part of santa fe's history from the very start. santa fe has been the subject of many books by many writers, a diverse range of writers, and this book has a terrific bibliography for anyone who wants to read more about santa fe. >> and now more from santa fe, new mexico, home to about 80,000 people and 250 art galleries. santa fe boasts a rich historical and literary culture. with the help of our local cable partner, comcast, booktv takes a tour of collected works bookstore, one of santa fe's 17 independent bookstores. >> welcome to collected works bookstore and coffeehouse. we're in santa fe, new mexico. my name is dorothy massey, and my daughter and co-owner have owned collected works for the last 18 of its now 35 years old as santa fe's oldest and, we think, best in the city. santa fe has a population of 80,000 people, and it supports no less than 17 independent bookstores. how does collected works and th
freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. countering violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not h
race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those amiable characteristics we think are worthy of the protections of our civil rights laws. in most states, there are modest exemptions to this employment at will doctrine around wrongful discharge. when an employer requires somebody to breakable law and order to keep their job or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of some well- defined ridden public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wide latitude because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person or entity that takes the risk and sets up the business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their businesses the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. this is but a small one. i am not saying you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified. in essence, what these laws do, right now they are saving employers from themselves. if they are ignoring all the unemployed workers, they really could be missing the best qualified person
of teotihuacan unified by religion ? again, household excavations provided answers. physical anthropologist rebecca storey. in all the compounds that have been excavated, there has always been a central courtyard. and in the middle of it, we generally find some kind of architectural feature. now, in this particular compound, it's a very elaborate and very beautiful one -- look at the detailing on the stone, and also look at the little ornaments on top of it. there are fragments that shows that it once was plastered and painted. so we have to remember that it would have been completely brighter and much more colorful, and really looked splendid. keach: these strange and splendid structures were altars. but who was being worshiped here ? in 1980, rebecca storey and dolph widmer excavated a residential compound in a neighborhood of the city now called tlajinga. the evidence showed people had lived in the compound for close to 500 years. underneath the central altar, archaeologists discovered several skeletons, buried decades apart. storey: when we excavated under the central courtyards of tlaj
, tribe, religion, region, whatever, your industry these days. politics is a lot about power. but we always hope that some people in the discussion of politics and policy will stand for something bigger, something broader. like the public interest, freedom and justice, the ideals of the declaration of the independence and the pledge of allegiance. we hope in washington that's what think tanks do. think tanks are separate from abstracted from the day-to-day struggles for either political power or special interests benefits from public policy. obviously, there are some who do that better than others. in the ideal of the think tank is committed to the public interest, even though we may disagree what the public interest is. some think tanks insist they don't have a world view a perspective, a political philosophy. they are just about analyzing and seeing what works. i'm in favor of that. but to define if something is working you have to define what the goals you seek to achieve. is freedom one of the goals that policy ought to enhance? is justice? is social progress? widespread prosperi
on religion. it is dropping a controversial health care form provision requiring religiously affiliated provision to cover cont contraceptions as part of the plans. jessica yellin is joining us with detalils. what is the latest then front, jessica? >> hi, wolf. this policy is meant to help those organizations like catholic universities that offer their own insurance policies, and self-insure, but object on moral grounds to offer contraception. does the policy go far enough? the jury is still out. >> medals of science -- >> reporter: obama administration officials say that proposed guidelines would ensure that women get contraception for free, and no objecting religious oorganization would have to pay for it, and a seemingly perfect compromise. >> we had to ensure that women have access to preventive services like contraception, and that the policy also respects religious beliefs. >> the policy would allow a self-insured organization like a catholic university to opt-out of providing birth control, and another insurance company would give employees birth control for free. >> this clarifi
. the state has become the major religion in this country. the icons in washington -- they have to destroy every aspect of people who hold to a higher moral authority. host: the headline in this morning "the wall street journal" -- castle in michigan, on our lands for democrats. -- ethel in michigan, on our line for democrats. caller: my question is, what happened between the separation between church and state? i believe this is more of a legal issue than a religious issue. the religious issue is for the contraceptive. i can understand that. why is this being mixed in with state issues? he did not have to take them if you do not want them, if you do not believe in them. don't use them. i just cannot understand why this does not go away. i am really quite tired of it all. thank you. host: more from the article in this morning's "the wall street journal." they write -- the new rules would require insurers to pay the up-front cost. our next call comes from carol in ohio, on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. i am totally against what the catholic church and republicans are doing a
happy to sponsor boy scouts and then they get more kids interested in the mormon religion. >> stephanie: oh, wow. so it's the mormons that are recruiting, not the gays. >> do they get the same prizes we do. >> stephanie: my toaster is lovely. >> even the mormons could -- as they did in the -- what is it, late '70s allow african-americans into the priesthood. they would have a revelation. >> stephanie: stop baptizing dead yous. >> exactly >> stephanie: words of the immortal judy tenuta. it could happen. back with more with matthew breen of "the advocate"." >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ i want the people who watch our show, to be able to come away armed with the facts, and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ freedom, freedom, freedom ♪ >> stephanie: it is the "stephanie miller show." welcome to it. twenty-one minutes after the hour. our guest live in studio, because he's so handsome and romantic. matthew breen, e
these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, certainly the first several decades people in washington were saying but if we done here? would conquer this land, but we didn't understand it and became governor. we should give it all back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there is just so much violence, so much slavery and hostagetaking in some unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. so that's part 2. part 3 is about carson's role in the conquest of the navajo people in everything he did with that monster slayer and this is the final act of his long career and probably woody's best known for common disorders campaign that is added to non-country that resulted in the conquest from their beloved land in this great experiment that went on to force the navajos to become farmers and christians living in the reservation and on the border with texas. so that's a big outfit has been a parts and the remarkable thing is kit carson is the through line that makes it make sense. he intersect did with all these aspects of his story out h
, specifically our melting pot of diversity. in five americans say they follow no religion at all. in today's i am america, carol costello look at the reasons why. >> here's a riddle. what do comedian kathy griffin and julianne moore and mark zuckerberg have in common in. >> hopefully one of america's most famous atheists. >> they are among those who do not believe god exists that. puts atheists around 5%. according to the pew study, one in five people claim they have no religious affiliation at all. why? the answers vary. there is a very activist atheist movement under way getting the message out on social media. take these facebook pages, for example. each has hundreds of thousands of likes. activist atheists have taken to you tube. ian evangelicals who tried to put the blame on godless schools for the newtown massacre. >> god didn't save the kids because he is not allowed in school. all of a sudden god respects the law of man. >> a massive crowd braved the cold for what was billed as the reason rally. >> i am here for the children in texas and other states who are being told lies about histo
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agree to those values and the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up to them. it's not always easy in the have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or to penicillin continue to stand up for them. on the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest from economic interest in moral interest and we have to continue to do that. but as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever, more agile and wish i had do that. for example are adtran, -- there are those who estimate that maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. but we try to do is say briefly mention is to get in there with them, undermine them and we've got them. it is something i did quite well in the cold war. the wife done this job, the more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some mono
of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values in the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up for them. it's not always easy and we have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or did, but will continue to stand up for them. and the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest, economic interests in more interests and we have to continue to do that. but then as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world that today requires us to be more clever, more agile and were trying to do that. for example, countering violent extremism, does this to me there are maybe 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and messaging today and are not and what we try to do is to get in there with him, to undermine non-and to rebut them. to dissent than we did quite well in the cold war. the more i've done this job, the more i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. no, we don't have some monolithic communist soviet union. but we
people standing up against militants and terrorists, using a religion, for instead as a mobilizing force. i think that charles is an instrument have had some efficacy in terms of precision. it's like saying, you know, we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come in. we use our road to an anti-terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. so you know, we don't see them as part of it at all. [inaudible] >> excuse me? [inaudible] >> you need to be a very big five on that committee will. but i think we are all in the same page now. members of the staff found where the future of this size. pakistan has to take ownership of absolutely all of them to be sustainable and be seen as legitimate in the eyes of ip hole. you know, there's been a lot of churn strikes next-door also. and in any case, you know the whole al qaeda is pretty much through our cooperation and joint efforts pretty much degraded. that said the administration will agree to also. >> thank you very much. you talk about the process in afghanistan being led. president karzai presents a pakistan and un
that we're the greatest country, because we're all different nationalities and all different religions and we should show the rest of the world how to behave. >> with reference to the nazis, what was that? >> well, he fought in the battle of the bulge. he's a war hero. so that's the reference. >> so the fact that he was obviously dramatically influenced by world war ii? >> exactly. >> and that's still part of your life right now. and that's what -- you see some connection with your experience -- >> well, violence has to be stopped. >> war is the lowest form of human behavior. killing is the worst form of -- you know, i just finished writing a book -- i'm not plugging it right now, but i wrote, life is a gift. we are blessed with being alive. we should enjoy it and enjoy our neighbors and help our cousins and relatives and friends, one another. we should all help one another. it's a gift. we have a gift with our lives. >> well, mr. bennett, danny, tony bennett, thank you both for coming in. if you won't sing, we're going to play some clips that we love to hear from you. >> i love this v
on the stand, all the talk of sex and religion. what is going on? >> two tracks here. they're trying to show travis alexander the victim in this case as a sexual deviant. this is a mormon community, could be there are mormons, also people that have conservative views on that jury, and so they're trying to appeal to those people on that jury. not only that, they're trying to show he had control over her. and that's the domestic violence part of this. self-defense, she's got to prove that in that moment, she says travis, she dropped travis alexander, this is a year or so after what we're seeing now. she drops his camera, travis alexander comes at her, she has to use deadly force, extreme deadly force on him. all of that is couched in the idea she was in this alexander and she was in a domestically violent relationship. and then they will have an expert on to say that she was a battered woman. >> cross-examination is going to be interesting. ryan smith, is sunny hostin, my thanks to both of you. make sure you check ryan on hln's "evening express" at 5:00 p.m. eastern. >>> we're getting word fr
time. it does not matter whether the person is jewish or whether they are any religion. that is a salutation, a greeting of goodwill. we have got to get over this sensitivity. it keeps people from saying what they really believe. i am reminded of a successful young businessman. he loved to buy his mother exotic gifts for mother's day and ran out of ideas. then he ran across these birds. they cost $5,000 apiece, they could dance, they could sing, they could talk. he bought two of them and send them to his mother, could not wait to call him. what did you think of those birds? she said, they were good. [laughter]he said, no, no, you did not eat those birds. they cost $5,000 -- they could dance, sing, talk. she said, they should have said something. [laughter]that is where we end up to if we do not speak up for what we believe. what we need to do -- [applause]what we need to do in this pc world is forget about unanimity of speech and unanimity of thought. we need to concentrate on being respectful to those people with whom we disagree. that is when we begin to make real pro
for your race or your tribe or your religion or your ideology or your region, whatever, your industry, these days, policy, politics is a lot about power. but we always hope that some people in the discussion of politics, and especially policy, will stand for something bigger, something broader, like the public interest, like freedom and justice, the ideals of the declaration of independence and constitution and the pledge of allegiance. and ideally we hope in washington that that's what think tanks do, that think tanks are separate from abstracted from the day-to-day struggles for either political power or special interest benefits from public policy. and, obviously, there are some who do that better than others but in the platonic ideal of the think tank is one committed to the public interest and even though we may disagree about what the public interest is. some think tanks insist they don't have an ideology, and worldview of perspective, a political philosophy. they are just about analyzing and seeing what works. i'm all in favor of analyzing things and seeing what works, but to d
of rights. free interests of religion is what is under attack here. all it does is put regulatory language what was proposed a year ago by the administration as a so-called compromise. it is not. it's a farce. it's an accounting trick. catholic university, for example, is compelled by the state under obama care to offer health insurance and the health insurer is compelled by the state to provide coverage of contraceptives. the cost obviously is going to be shifted back to catholic university and its students. simple police officer a gimmick. the worst part how you define worship. churches you worship on sunday are completely exempt because that would be outrage. the secularists at the department of h.h.s. religious only the place where you go on sunday. only a place where you worship god. but if you are a catholic soup kitchen, where you are doing god's work, that's not considered religious. that from and of itself is an outrage. >> the crux of this is that nonprofits hobby horse. >> hobby lobby? >> the craft store. >> the cavity craft store which they are not part of this provision as wel
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not have an up-to-date broadcast
are going to be the ones running this at the end. >> she is going to drug you what america's religion which is democracy and everyone in america loves democracy. on a grant that. i plead guilty to taking that. >> and i am right there with you but this is not about -- there is much more going on here to get anybody that knows the middle east knows that the borders were drawn around people that don't necessarily want to live together. we have seen this in israel, palestinians and jews do not want to live together. now, we could say let's have democracy and have a one state solution. joost not want a one-stop solution and palestinians do not want a one-stop solution. it's not about the democracy in palestine and israel and its about the democracy in iraq. we said was going to make democracy and cast the sunni is down. they were not. they pushed the sunnis out of every job in the military, the government, the education system and that is what is going to have been anybody that thinks that when the takeover and syria that they are going to incorporate the national institutions into the next stat
when i talk about freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not ha
, regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation, or disability deserve to be safe and protected from physical violence, and that's what this reauthorization would help to do. mr. president, finally let me say that this is not and never should be a partisan issue. violence, domestic assaults do not discriminate between republicans and democrats, independents and greens, or people who are not politically active at all. this is an equal opportunity crime that harms people regardless of their political affiliation, their profession, their location, their status in life. it is an issue that deserves bipartisan support. and i hope that my colleagues on both sides of the aisle will come together and pass this important bill. i recognize that there may be some provisions of this bill which are controversial, but surely we can come together in support of the goal of this vital legislation. we can work out differences if not on the senate floor, then in conference with the house. but surely we can come together and reauthorize this law that has made such a difference to so many in our country.
standing up against militants and terrorists, using our religion, for instance, as a mobilizing force. i think that drones as an instrument may have had some efficacy in terms of decisions, but we cannot allow us f-16's to come in. we use our own to run our anti- terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. drones are really -- we do not see them as productive at all. >> what would you tell the staff? what do you tell a member of the general staff? i think we are all on the same page now. members of the general staff and ourselves, where the future of this lies. pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door, and in any case you know that al qaeda, the whole -- through our cooperation and joint efforts, is pretty much degraded. that is something this administration will agree to also. >> james madison -- as british troops invaded the capital, she is known for saving eight portrait of george
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)